Media Centre

Here you will find Pitney Bowes' latest press releases, articles and case studies, as well as archived information.

How rude are you? Texting during lunch and checking emails during meetings...The modern day habbits that wind us up

Type Title Views Download
document 11092013 Mail online.docx 59
How rude are you? Texting during lunch and checking emails during meetings...The modern day habbits that wind us up

  • Almost 50 per cent of workers admit to being annoyed by constant texting and typing
  • 'The New Rude' study claims businesses are actually losing clients due to concentrating on technology
  • Another 38 per cent can't stand loud conference calls, while 18 per cent find emailing in text speak rude

Forget arriving late for a meeting or offering up a weak handshake, what really annoys today's high-fliers is a reliance on technology.

Almost half of workers are irritated by business contacts who relentlessly check their phones and emails during meetings, according to new research.

Furthermore, the habit is proving such a faux pas, it could actually cost companies new clients.

Emails and texting in public cause frustration in Germany and the U.S.

Emails and texting in public cause frustration in Germany and the U.S.

 

Talking on phones in public and checking emails in a meeting irk people

Talking on phones in public and checking emails in a meeting irk people

 

Texts and lunch and txt spk in emails annoy the Germans

Texts and lunch and txt spk in emails annoy the Germans

It's not just non-stop typing which gets under the skin, noisy conference calls also rub colleagues up the wrong way, with 38 per cent complaining about workmates who broadcast their deals to the entire office.

 

More...

Other habits which could ruin relationships in the business world include firing off LinkedIn invites to random people, emailing the person at the next desk, using capitals to emphasise a point, while using text speak in online correspondence has also made the list of the biggest irritants.

The study, entitled 'The New Rude', shows that rather than helping to improve relations in business, our obsession with technology is actually proving a hindrance.

A lack of an email signature and not making eye contact when shaking hands are unpopular in France and Germany respectively

A lack of an email signature and not making eye contact when shaking hands are unpopular in France and Germany respectively

 

Read receipts and LinkedIn invitations are among the most irritating problems of modern life

Read receipts and LinkedIn invitations are among the most irritating problems of modern life

Leaving the ring tone on and emailing meeting invites without a context were particularly disliked in France and Germany respectively

Leaving the ring tone on and emailing meeting invites without a context were particularly disliked in France and Germany respectively

 

Unnecessary use of CAPITALS in emails and emailing someone at the next desk are particularly annoying to the Americans and Germans

Unnecessary use of CAPITALS in emails and emailing someone at the next desk are particularly annoying to the Americans and Germans

 

 

 

 

Hindrance: The modern world's obsession with technology could actually lose them business

Hindrance: The modern world's obsession with technology could actually lose companies business

 

And it's not just Brits who see red when faced with rude behaviour - workers in the U.S., Germany and France have exactly the same gripes.

Hina Sharma, Head of Brand for Europe at communication experts Pitney Bowes, said: 'It may seem obvious, but manners matter, and business etiquette plays a subtle yet important role in building and developing relationships.

'How you present yourself will have lasting effects on potential clients; whether it be in person, over the phone, email or physical mail, it's fundamental that SMEs step in to the client's shoes, and ask themselves how they would like to be approached.

'While technology has undoubtedly revolutionised the business world, it's important to use it appropriately and know when to switch it off.

'If you're meeting with a prospective or a long-term client for example, your focus should be on them, not your phone'.

Source   DailyMail Online

(0) Comment